To sign up for NIME15 workshops, please fill out our NIME15 Workshop Sign-Up Form

.


 

Digital Stompbox Design using Satellite CCRMA

Workshop Instructor(s):
Edgar Berdahl - Berdahl Innovations
Esteban Maestre – McGill University

Part-day workshop: afternoon (1 – 4 PM)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Digital Media Center, Room 1014

Contact edgarberdahl@lsu.edu with questions.

This workshop will help jump-start each participant’s journey into the wild world of imagining and realizing new ways of interacting with and creating digital audio effects. By the end of the workshop, each participant will customize an effect using a take-home stompbox that is stage-ready. Beginning and intermediate participants will benefit primarily from being led through a series of basic exercises in using the stompbox, while advanced participants may be most interested in discussing how to extend the functionalities of the stompbox via embedded Linux.

The workshop is based on open-source software and open-source hardware, so the possibilities are limited only by the imagination. The stompbox contains Satellite CCRMA featuring Arduino and the Raspberry Pi as well as knobs, buttons, footswitches, some other sensors, and an acrylic enclosure. Interested participants could later customize the template for the enclosure and laser-cut their own enclosure using a mail-order service.

Keywords: Embedded musical instruments and embedded sound art installations, Novel musical instruments, Platforms and frameworks for musical interaction design, Sonic interaction design

 


 

BeagleRT Embedded Audio Workshop

Workshop Instructor(s):
Andrew McPherson – Queen Mary University of London
Victor Zappi – University of British Columbia

Full-day workshop (9AM – 4 PM)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Digital Media Center, Room 1008B & MILL

Contact a.mcpherson@qmul.ac.uk with questions.

This daylong workshop will feature hardware hacking and audio programming using BeagleRT, a new ultra-low-latency real-time instrument creation platform for the BeagleBone Black single-board computer. Each participant will use a D-Box “hackable instrument” based on BeagleRT, begin- ning by modifying and circuit-bending the hardware. In the second half of the workshop, participants will write new audio code for the instrument, creating their own sounds and playing techniques. Together these activities will show how to create completely new digital musical instruments using BeagleRT. The platform is fully open source; no fee is needed to participate but participants will have the option to buy hardware to keep after the workshop.

More information: http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/~andrewm/beaglert-workshop.html

Keywords: Embedded musical instruments and embedded sound art installations, Novel controllers and interfaces for musical expression, Novel musical instruments, Sensor and actuator technologies

 


 

A NIME Primer

Workshop Instructor(s):
Michael Lyons – Ritsumeikan University
Sidney Fels – University of British Columbia

Part-day workshop: afternoon (1 – 4 PM)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Digital Media Center Theater

Attending NIME for the first time can be an overwhelming experience. Beginners may find it difficult to make sense of the vast array of topics presented during the busy program of talks and posters, or appreciate the significance of the wide variety of demos and concerts. This half-day tutorial is intended to provide a general and gentle introduction to the theory and practice of the design of interactive systems for music creation and performance. Our target audience consists of newcomers to the field who would like to start research projects, as well as interested students, people from other fields and members of the public with a general interest in the potential of NIME. We aim to give our audience an entry point to the theory and practice of musical interface design by drawing on case studies from previous years of the conference. Past attendees of the tutorial have told us that they gained a helpful perspective that helped them to increase their understanding and appreciation of their first NIME.

Keywords: Surveys of past work and stimulating ideas for future research (primary keyword), Artistic, cultural, and social impact of NIME technology, Musical human-computer interaction, Musical mapping strategies


 

Cloud

Workshop Instructor(s):
Ivica Bukvic – Virginia Tech
Aki Ishida – Virginia Tech

Part-day workshop: morning (9 AM – Noon)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Shaw Center, Second Floor

Contact ico@vt.edu with questions.

 

We propose a constellation of 18 cloudlets that were programmed through an all-age-appropriate workshop and as a result whose presence is a reflection of the community that made it. The cloudlets emit light and sound in response to light and sound generated by other cloudlets, people, and the environment. Each cloudlet’s aluminum honeycomb and acrylic vessel contains a Raspberry Pi microcomputer, light sensors, microphone, multi-color LEDs, and a small speaker that driven by Virginia Tech’s Pd-L2ork free open source software. In its original iteration workshop participants from Arlington businesses, organizations, and schools customized the behaviors of each cloudlet. Cloud grew cumulatively as more people partook in its making and activation. We envision the same process at NIME conference.

Through the use of community- and team-building workshops, 18 teams, each consisting of one to six members will be given an opportunity to uniquely customize the behaviors of cloudlets and place them in their final location under the artists’ aesthetic and technical guidance. There are four different heights of cloudlets, each with its own color and sound properties. As people walk in and out of the ensuing constellation, the sounds will be heard and lights perceived spatially from multiple heights and directions. Each cloudlet therefore manifests unique behavior and feeds off of each other’s sound and light as customized by the community participants. Cloudlets as a whole, form the Cloud, a reflection of the community that made them.

Keywords: Interactive sound art and installations (primary keyword), Artistic, cultural, and social impact of NIME technology, Embedded sound art installations, Sonic interaction design


 

Crafting Computational Percussion with Everyday Materials

Workshop Instructor(s):
HyunJoo Oh – University of Colorado, Boulder
Jiffer Harriman – University of Colorado, Boulder
Abhishek Narula – University of Colorado, Boulder

Part-day workshop: afternoon (1 – 4 PM)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Digital Media Center, Room 1030

Also 2-4 PM at RedStick Festival Maker Faire, Saturday, May 30

Contact abhishek.narula@colorado.edu with questions.

This studio-type hands-on workshop invites participants to create percussion instruments with everyday materials such as paper, cardboard, bottles, and foam, using our Rhythm Board to connect sensors, servos, and solenoids. We plan to use the NIME workshop to design a creative pedagogical method that motivates novices to understand basic electronic and computing concepts, and to provide an engaging musical experience. We encourage participants to bring everyday materials they want to explore; we will provide sensors, actuators, and a custom microcontroller as well as more materials participants can use together. The workshop is in multiple phases. Participants start by exploring unique sounds of diverse materials. Then they integrate mechanical movements (rack and pinion, crank, and Geneva drive) using servos and solenoids, and analog sensors (light sensor, IR sensor, pressure sensor, and potentiometer) with the Rhythm Board to control the speed of the servo movements, generating scratching, shaking, and tapping motions. Finally, participants will share their prototypes and discuss the potentials and challenges of this playful learning medium.

https://craftingpercussion.wordpress.com

Keywords: Interaction design and software tools (primary keyword), Musical human-computer interaction, Novel controllers and interfaces for musical expression

 


 

Learning to Program Haptic Interactions using Max: Applications With Sound

Workshop Instructor(s):
Edgar Berdahl – Berdahl Innovations
Alexandros Kontogeorgakopoulos – Cardiff School of Art and Design

Part-day workshop: morning (9AM – Noon)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Digital Media Center, Room 1014

Contact edgarberdahl@lsu.edu with questions.

In this workshop, participants will learn how to program force-feedback haptic interactions in Max for making music. During the workshop, each participant will borrow a FireFader haptic device with the option of purchasing it at the end of the workshop.

When programmed in Max, audio signal flow is typically primarily unidirectional (top to bottom). In contrast, programming force feedback typically involves bidirectional audio-haptic signal flow between virtual physical elements. For this reason, programming haptic force feedback can seem daunting at first because it requires a physical way of thinking. This workshop aims to get participants easily up to speed by examining simple example haptic interactions in the familiar Max programming environment. Many of these examples are based on physical models and leverage Max’s palette of visualization objects to help communicate the means of operation to participants. More advanced examples help provide participants with specific insight into how haptics can be integrated into novel music compositions and sound art.

Keywords: Haptic and force feedback devices (primary keyword), Interactive sound art and installations, Multimodal expressive interfaces, Novel controllers and interfaces for musical expression, Novel musical instruments, Robotic music, Sensor and actuator technologies

 


 

Citygram

Workshop Instructor(s):
Michael Musick – New York University
Tae Hong Park – New York University

Part-day workshop: morning (9AM – Noon)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Digital Media Center, Room 1034

Contact musick@nyu.edu with questions.

This workshop will focus on the capture, analysis, and real-time music compositional capabilities afforded by current work in soundscape research through the Citygram (CG) Project. The workshop will offer a hands-on session following an overview of the CG Project which will present its approaches to soundscape and acoustic ecology research, overview of our comprehensive cyber-physical sensor network, and potentials for exploration of musical, creative, and spatial analysis using real-time and historical spatio-acoustic data streams. The session with then be followed by a comprehensive introduction to how real-time soundscape data can be used within a variety of real-time music systems.

Keywords: Biological and bio-inspired systems (primary keyword), Interactive sound art and installations, Musical mapping strategies, Novel controllers and interfaces for musical expression


 

Making Music with Robotic Instruments

Workshop Instructor(s):
Troy Rogers – Expressive Machines Musical Instruments
Steven Kemper – Music Department, Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Scott Barton – Humanities and Arts Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Part-day workshop: afternoon (1 – 4 PM)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Digital Media Center, Room 1034

Contact stevenTkemper@gmail.com with questions.

Musical Robotics combines many of the technical skills relevant to NIME participants, including mechanics, electronics, hardware and software design, as well as musicality. In this half-day workshop, Expressive Machines Musical Instruments (EMMI) co-founders Troy Rogers, Scott Barton, and Steven Kemper will guide participants through a hands-on workshop that will focus on all areas of designing a robotic musical instruments. Using EMMI-designed kits, participants will build and program a simple percussion robot, as well as get a chance to compose a short piece for this new instrument. At the end of the workshop, all of the pieces will be shared in a mini-concert. In addition to the hands-on portion of the event, the presenters will discuss the history of robotic instruments as well as provide a survey of contemporary practitioners in the field. They will also discuss more advanced topics related to robotic instruments, including human-robot interaction, electroacoustic hybrid instruments, and compositional aesthetics.

Keywords: Robotic music (primary keyword)

 


 

Performing with NIMEs

Workshop Instructor(s):
Hans Leeuw – University of the Arts Utrecht / CeReNeM University of Huddersfield
Pierre Alexandre Tremblay – CeReNeM – University of Huddersfield
Palle Dahlstedt – Aalborg University, Denmark / University of Gothenburg

Full-day workshop (9 AM – 4 PM)
Sunday, May 31, 2015
Shaw Center, Hartley/Vey

Contact hans@electrumpet.nl with questions.

Requires Work Submission.

This is a proposal for a workshop on using instrumental NIMEs in performance. The goal of the workshop is to effectively share knowledge, skills and methods between virtuoso and experienced musicians and possibly educators in live electronic music performance. We are especially interested in those aspects of performance that can or should be influential to the design of instrumental NIMEs, or better even, have been part of such a design process already. The workshop will culminate in a proposed performance at the NIME conference aimed at letting the audience experience the expressive qualities that are the target of this workshop.

The content of the workshop is proposed by the participants of the workshop and will be moderated and added to by the three proposers of the workshop. The participants of the workshop are subjected to a selection process in which both the level of virtuosity and the proposed content for the workshop are judged. The proposers of the workshop will add their own content and reshape participants content in order to have a coherent full day workshop. A performance will be the outcome at the conclusion of the workshop. 

Application format: Potential participants must contribute two things: 1. A recording (preferably a video) of the applicant performing with his or her intended setup in preferably a collaborative musical environment that shows both the performers experience and musical intention. 2. A proposal for a workshop contribution (exercise(s), mind set, improvisation rule set etcetera) that addresses one of the following points: a. Collaborative music making in a live electronic context. b. Virtuosity on NIMEs. c. The link between performance and instrument design. The workshop contribution should involve active participation from the workshop participants. If you want ‘homework preparation’ to be part of the workshop proposal you are allowed to do so.

Workshop participants should see their contribution as an exchange and a means to further the development of NIME in the direction of performance. Although we want to showcase the workshop with a performance at NIME, and think that this is a necessary part of the whole setup; we do not want performers to apply because of the (extra) playing opportunity that is provided, although they should enjoy it, of course.

Keywords: Musicianship of new musical interfaces (primary keyword), Experiences with novel interfaces in live performance and composition